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, marcusreddeker.com. >>> from the 17th annual texas book festival in successen, texas, we discuss the book "syria: the fall of the house oo assad." >> thank you so much foruch for spending part of your afternoony with us here.s i would like to welcome you alle on behalf of the professor and myself. this is afessor l wesonderful s. i'm saying that dispassionately, and we're so happy you're here.r i wanted to introduce the profe professor to you. he is asch to professor of middt history at trinity university it san antonio. professor lesch is a prolific writer writer and thinker about the the middle east and what's happening in the region. it's really a treat tosy a havem here today.he h w he's written his new book n b "syria: the fall of the house ou assad" which i'm hoping you'll m all purchase and get him toill sign. he signed my copy first so he f. has met extensively with met president assad and officials lg between 2004-2011, been in the middle east, studying the middle st east, making connections andeast friendships in the middle east for a quar ater century. the r why that's important is, o
, secretary panetta, since president obama made a statement about syria and chemical weapons again and secretary clinton did, we understand the red line, but the world this week certainly growing concern about syria's potential use of chemical weapons. can we ask you your view on this, how concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential response, a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. the whole world is watching. the whole world's watching very closely. the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cons qenszs. -- consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their open people. i'm not going to s
to send patriot missiles to turkey's border with syria. a shooting at a school in the united states -- 27 people reported dead. most of them children. >> it happened friday morning at an elementary school in the state of connecticut. a parent inside the school at the time reports hearing was sounded like at least 100 rounds being fired. >> this is the scene at sandy hook elementary school. sources saying the suspect is also among the dead and that the body is in a classroom at the school. police say they have recovered two weapons from the suspect. the students kindergarten through fourth graders were all evacuated to a nearby fire station. all schools in the area are under lock down right now. >> law enforcement officials has -- have confirmed the shooter has been found dead inside the school building. >> officials say the scene of the shooting is now secure. >> there were several fatalities at the scene, both students and staff. the shooter is deceased inside the building. >> the governor took a call from president obama a little while ago, who was calling to express his condolences and
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
: good evening i'm eliot spitzer and this is "viewpoint." after months of bloodshed in syria, the u.s. could be close to recognizing the country's rebel coalition. cairo's tahrir square is once again the scene of angry protests and as the islam mist dominated constituent assembly pushes you through the draft constitution. yes, the middle east is living down to its reputation as the world's leading source of turmoil. we start tonight in syria. the damascus airport was reopened friday following fighting that saw international flights canceled thursday republics say they destroyed regular syrian army vehicles near the airport while syrian military jets bombed damascus suburbs that are the strongholds for the rebellan. the rebels have enjoyed a series of tactical successes in the recent weeks capturing air bases and military supplies. the rebels have also scored on the diplomatic front as britain, france, turkey and the gulf cooperation council recently recognized their umbrella group the national coalition of syrian revolutionary and oppositional forces as the legitimate representative
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
are speaking only about foreign policy and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i do want to thank those who made this possible and as chairman of the key subcommittee i value the work that you do, each of you do on a range of policies, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, syria which i will focus on but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress and i am grateful for that help. i know that the theme of this year's forum is, quote, dictators and dissidents:should the west choose sides? quite topical given the events that have played out most recently whether it is the arabs spring, or nascent democratic openings, i would argue the central question maybe is one of process. that question being whether the u.s. the west should support the democratic process such that citizens are able to choose their own leaders. even when the process gives rise to politic
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
upon so soon, but, you know, at the time, syria was looking, you know, as the sequential arab revolts came into being, there was very few places where the united states had an easy or even a conceivable influence -- edge to come in and do something where the consequences were not dramatic. they were at least, you know, there could be a pos five, you know, of course, egypt, a long-time ally anchor in the middle east, supportive of israel, and tunisia was a little bit, but, by that point, already crossed the threshold and ali was out, and syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, very different. it's a multisectarian society with lots and lots of, you know, connections to other powers into which are iran, lebanon, israel, you know, where disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. libya presented a -- was unique that that the libyans -- there was a popular uprising, there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward instead of on the first unofficial, then increasingly of
'm craig melvin. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. coming up, we will go inside syria as concern goes up over whether the assad regime will use its kchemical weapons stash on its own people. >>> and a tea party republican bough out. what that will mean. we're going to talk to the head of the tea party express. >>> later, as the supreme court gears up to take on same-sex marriage, we'll look at how far the fight for equality has come with someone who has been key in changing the image of being gay in america. we'll get to all those things in a moment. first, some new developments in egypt today as the opposition rejects president morsi's planned december 15th vote on a new constitution. morsi offered to drop a controversial plan to expand his powers but let the constitution issue stand. cairo, meanwhile, quiet today. over the past several days, that has not been the case. thousands of pro and anti-morsi demonstrators have taken to the streets of cairo and other major cities there as well. for more on this and all things egypt, i'd like to bring in our man on the ground
the morning talking about syria. the regime with one of the large stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world and biological weapons. a man who has slaughtered 40,000 as some people and clearly is capable of slaughtering many, many more. and i certainly learned a lot from these individuals who are sitting here. one thing i learned just the other day which i was aware of actually from the board is that since world war ii in the least has seen more weapons of mass destruction attacks than any other place on earth. just to go through the list here which may or may not be aware of, egyptians use toggle weapons against yemen between 1963 and 1967. in 1986 the iraqis used chemical weapons against iranians and it is reported that iranians use chemical weapons against iraqis. in 1987 as a chemical weapons against chad. and, of course, as most of you remember, saddam hussein used mustard gas against the kurds. and those of the years when the middle east was stable. think about that. that was when stability brought. well, now we're in the middle of the great arab revolt. the great arab revolt means tha
. >>> plus, syria on edge. the fighting there has reportedly killed some 40,000 people now. we'll talk to a top expert on the region. that's copping up as well. >>> first, though, he spen the last seven years walking the halls of the house. now he's headed home. connie mack moving out. before he does it, he gives his final thoughts. it will be his exit interview next. [ female announcer ] caroline penry began using olay total effects in 2001. since then, there's been one wedding, 2 kids, and 43 bottles of olay total effects. so in spite of 185 tantrums 378 pre-dawn starts and a lot of birthdays, caroline still looks amazing. you can challenge what's possible thanks to the trusted performance of olay. 60 years, millions of women, real results. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, ba
organization. >> joining me now to help us understand what this means in syria and the larger context of the middle east, from the hoover institution, one of the most astute observers of middle eastern politics. thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much, governor. >> eliot: is this recognition by president obama too little too late or appropriately calibrated calibrated. >> you stole my line. it's too little, too late. it doesn't matter what the obama administration is doing. we waited 21 months. 40,000 syrians were killed. thousands of syrian versus fled to turkey, iraq and jordan. many are refugees. the city has been completely leveled to the ground, and now we come, we offer this recognition, it's very lame. >> eliot: will we be in position to affect the outcome. let me state this as a premise. i take it as a premise that assad will fall at some point. his civil society is fallen. do you accept that premise. >> it was a year ago when the obama administration said bashar is a dead man walking. a year later we can see that this may be the end game, but it has nothing to do wi
. revolution is going. syria is teetering, jordan is burning and the future is yet to be written. the question, will there be elections, will islamists win, will it be one man one vote or one man, one vote, one time. with that, we are going to debate the motion, if democracy is going to triumph are victories at the ballot box unavoidable. we will have opening remarks from our panelists. from there, we will have some question and answers from myself and the audience and our panelists will be allowed two minutes at the end to restate their case and potentially persuade you to believe in what they believe. we'll start with reuel. you may begin. >> this is at such an angle, i don't think i can drink. >> i'm confident you will find a way to drink. >> i want to thank everyone for coming and particularly i want to thank my co-panelists here. rob and i have been debating this issue for almost a decade. certainly with bret, i don't think i ever disagreed with him except on this issue and i particularly have to thank my debating colleague, brian katulis from the center of american progress. it shows the
intelligence officials have a large-scale terror plots in october and into syria, where the reports yesterday of chemical weapons being moved. i'm increasingly worried the terrorists may have programs by turkey, jordan or other countries where persons may fully to escape the bloodshed. it is imperative the interagency security screening process for all refugees be formidable incredible. the purpose of this hearing is to identify any remaining gaps in the security screening process they need to be remedied in to ensure that dhs and the state department had the necessary tools and resources at their disposal to deal to carry out the necessary security checks. it is concerning to me that either of the iraqi refugees arrested last year had worked for any u.s. military diplomatic or nongovernmental organization in iraq. get both receive refugee status based on humanitarian reasons. all this being said, i am glad that the agency security screening and adjudication process for refugees has undergone and continues to undergo a number of enhancements since it was initiated. in particular that's a call
brotherhood have no desire to expand the freedom of its citizens. they're about to implement syria law. they're protesting the seizure of unrestricted powers by the nation's islamist president and his draft helicopters substitution. what you're looking at is the worst explosion of protesters since the removal of mubarak. women have no rights, no protection from the government unthe new law. i hear one thing from the usually deafening voices of women's liberal groups. silence. is birth control the only defining issue of the u.s. feminist movement? what a double standard we're now witnessing. joining me now for act for america, the president, briggite gabriel. guys, welcome to the program. thank you for being here. this is amazing. we go through a whole election, republican war on women. they don't want to pay for women's birth control. we know what life for women is like. in saudi arabia they can't drive. under the taliban they couldn't go to school or work. we see the stoning of women, women in saudi arabia, they need four male eyewitnesses for rape. all of this. where is the women's movemen
went to syria now they get it from both sides. the state and whenever the rebellion is. we have that in the wake of being expelled. i met an old man who had to flee in 1970 with his wife and said christians did not see the writing on the wall and they should have. the same with egypt. now there is a terrible risk. a huge and christian population. the rich are leaving that they can afford a lawyer or the airplane ticket but what is left are the poor. where will they go on foot? sudan, libya and israel by a are putting up another wall. so they cannot go there either. it is an massive refugee problem waiting to happen in. a pattern repeating itself over and over. i know how to sound the alarm with what is coming with refugees. it will be a nightmare. we just finished with the manuscript. it is not a survey but an analysis of the authorities that persecute christians. there are so many we had to add an additional section in the book to cover it. it is a huge problem. the countries that have been expelled by the most obvious because the same thing happens to the christians now. and t
and you will have situations where radical extremist groups can hijack egypt or libya or syria or elsewhere were you don't have a strong push back which is what i'm suggesting we and our allies in the west need to help provide , support to these brave liberals and moderates in the muslim world who do want to push back but just need the tools to be able to do so. >> try and answer to that question. died and liberty. i think it goes to of the idea that in the concept of god that we have and the judeo-christian approach, there is a sole that each individual has a soul. and that means that each individual is an individual. there are no two alike. and that is the basis for quality. because that means no matter how strong you are, how bright you are, how rich you are, it doesn't matter. you have a soul. i have a soul. we are equal in that sense. that is the case than you have to have liberty because the individual, there is nothing like that individual's own decision to move the decision maker. that gets into the economics of things that we talk about in the public forum. so that is
afghanistan, to syria to iran to north carolina we also must recognize -- north korea we also must recognize the regimes that threaten the united states and allies. therefore we must ensure our military is sufficiently resourced and that our national leaders priretize our resources towards efforts that are appropriate for the u.s. military and our national vite al security interests. i look forward to learning more toobt situation on the ground as well as what the u.s. government is doing to address the situation in the drc. mr. smith. >> thank you, mr. president. i thank you very u much for holding this hearing. this is a very important issue. as you described the situation in the eastern drc is dire. it's the largest humanitarian crisis that too few people have herd of. in some estimation over the course of the last 15 to 20 years now nearly 5 million people have been killed many more wounded injured raped displaced. it is a place where a lot of people are suffering. and it is a place where i believe we can make a difference in helping to reduce that suffering. stability in the region is i
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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